June 16, 2003
permalink I think you are a bit too controlled. Pull back on your control.

"Holy totally confused, how can I walk this tightrope without a working pancreas batman"?

It was a bit of a mind boggler at my last appointment when my doctor was a git (oops - spelling mistake) bit concerned that I might be having too many hypos. I was hypoing most days at around 18 weeks, but the hypos were really mild eg 3.3, 3.4, 3.5 and I was picking them all up due to frequent testing. The number of hypos in the 2.something range was very rare.

I wasn't keen on hypos and was going through a lot of lucozade, but at the same time, it seemed hard to avoid them if I was aiming for the legendary 4-7 range.

He told me they weren't entirely sure what the effect of hypoglycemia was on the fetus (!!!grrrr!!!! after me finding about five sources that said hypos didn't do the fetus any harm!!!) and he thought I should "pull back on my control" a bit. When I registered complete horror, shock and dismay he reassured me, "Don't worry, I'm not worried about the baby at all, just your quality of life".

He also reminded me that even though good glycemic control during the 2nd and 3rd trimesters was still important (mainly to avoid the baby getting large (macrosomic) which can complicate birth and lead to a few problems in newborns, it wasn't necessary to be as strict as in the first trimester when all the baby's organs are forming. Hmmmm.

Anyway, he needn't fear as hormones seem to have taken matters into their own hands now at 24 weeks. Just after 23 weeks my blood sugar levels started to creep up and I'm now worried again at getting too high and the baby growing too big. Finding it hard to work out a pattern.

Ah, the neverending rollercoaster that is diabetes and pregnancy!

Tee hee. There I was just gloating about my marvellous 4.9 when he hit me with the 'we haven't fully mapped out the effect of hypos on the fetus' line. And then he asked me, "You really are enjoying this pregnancy aren't you?"

"Was for a minute there" I felt like saying.

**NB Author would like to emphasise that her endocrinologist is just wonderful. A totally gorgeous, supportive and knowledgeable person and she doesn't feel she could have done it without him. He was legitimately concerned about my quality of life and also with the possibility of me ending up with hypoglycemic unawareness, which can be dangerous for many people with diabetes.

Posted by M.A. at June 16, 2003 01:40 PM


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